Dystopia Now: Comprehending Crony Capitalism

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Published on: February 22, 2016

In the 1975 dystopian film Rollerball, the entire world is ruled by an unassailable, omnipotent entity called “The Energy Corporation.” It had to be a corporation rather than a government of course, since this was the time when demonizing corporations was just becoming fashionable as a result of leftist influences in Hollywood.

The truth in our time is closer to this: The goals of the government and its crony capitalist cohorts have become the same, their chief goals being amassing power and the enslavement of citizens – or “the masses,” as those on the left might say.

Many capitalists, conservatives, and libertarian types see a major contradiction in Western captains of industry, some even having come from modest means, enrolling into the doctrine of global socialism. How could they perceive socialistic policies – which stultify and punish the very actions which made them successful – as being anything other than destructive?

There are a few key reasons; while knowing them may be intellectually satisfying, this hardly matters in the tactical sense.

Some of these people are simply not intelligent enough to recognize the dichotomy, nor socialism’s cloying, deleterious effects. It’s a fallacy that those who achieve material success generally do so because they’re really smart. Just look at the entertainment industry.

Others aren’t well-read or experienced enough to have come to a realistic conclusion with respect to socialism. Thus, they don’t believe that socialism is destructive. They hear the entreaties of socialist politicos with whom they hobnob and take them at their lying word.

Then, there are those who started out as socialists or communists. Like the radicals of the post World War II era and the 1960s, they knew that they had to change the system from within if they were to do so at all. They set about achieving material success so that they might feather their own next while amassing enough power to advance their agenda. Others became lawyers and operators in the financial industry for the same reasons.

Today’s captains of industry simply aren’t the personally-invested, entrepreneurial creators of the last two centuries who loved their country and cared about their legacies. Self-centered in the extreme, many are degreed, spoiled parasites and lazy career activists who, like comic book villains, wish to impose their noxious vision upon cringing subjects while they wring their hands and giggle.

The proliferation of crony capitalism we’ve seen in recent years is a direct function of this transformation of the political landscapes. To the gullible, they sell the rationale of the world “evolving beyond” nation-states, when their goal is to create a leviathan socialist nation-state through the subjugation-by-guile of traditional nation-states.

The process has been going on for quite some time, of course. We saw more recently among those in government the attitude of envisioning themselves as the quasi-royalty of a global pantheon of elites, people who had transcended notions of nationalistic loyalty or patriotism. As economic interests became more global, it became expedient (in the selfish sense) and far easier for American corporate heads and major shareholders to adopt a similar attitude and sell the country out.

This all happened while most Americans weren’t paying attention, not voting, indulging themselves, and abdicating their civic responsibility while minions of the enemy – socialism – effectively infiltrated government, education, media, the press, and key positions in business and the financial sector.

Hope this helped to clear up some of the confusion on this issue.

Article reposted with permission from Constitution.com

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