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We’re No Longer Tolerating Leftist Celebrity Blather

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Published on: August 3, 2017

A significant development on the political landscape that represents something of a barometer for popular backlash against progressivism in America (and to a lesser extent, the former presidential administration) is the phenomenon of intolerance with regard to disingenuous political activists and political activism among celebrities.

“Intolerance?” you ask. Yes, though the very word has taken on a connotation of something untoward and dishonorable, it is an accurate characterization of what’s going on – but it represents a more commonplace, un-prejudiced and proper reaction on the part of mainstream Americans to the effluvia of leftist propaganda to which they have been subjected.

As the reader may have noticed, at about the same time millions of Americans were sizing up presidential candidates ahead of the 2016 primaries, the trend that had developed over the previous few years began to evidence more potency, and it was singularly indicative of and associated with the aforementioned popular backlash against progressivism.

First of all, despite establishment press collusion intended to bolster leftist messages, Americans began to recognize that, for example, certain racialist activist groups that had gained notoriety were not the righteous civic advocates of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, but rather, operatives of malignant ideological factions.

Then, there were the celebrities. Pop stars, movie and TV actors, and high-profile sports figures who came out in favor of their clueless causes du jour were not being viewed with the same level of deference as in years past. There had been a time when these celebs could pontificate upon whatever was near and dear to their hearts in the name of social consciousness, and, excepting extremely seditious displays like that of Jane Fonda protesting the Vietnam War in 1972, much of it was accepted by the public as the celebrity’s right to free speech or a factor of their eccentricity.

Fast-forward to 2017, however, and we get the distinct impression that, for lack of a more delicate term, the public is sick of hearing their crap.

This week, former Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis aired his opinion, not of America’s racism, homophobia, the evils of capitalism or some such twaddle, but of the on-field antics of NFL veteran Colin Kaepernick, who protested the national anthem during the 2016 season, bringing down the wrath of patriotic fans on the entire NFL and making it hard for him to get a job during the following free-agency period.

Lewis suggested that in future, Kaepernick should keep his political opinions to himself and limit his public representation to displays of his talent and abilities on the field.

Also this week, in an exhibit that should leave no doubt as to why she is no longer a going concern in broadcast television, comedian Rosie O’Donnell urged her female fans to start their own political party due to the Democrat Party’s failure to take on a radical platform stance on unfettered abortion.

O’Donnell’s patently ridiculous suggestion is a quintessential example of the ignorance prevalent within the celebrity community. As with their unthinking and perennial support for a Democratic Party that has become increasingly radicalized, they simply do not realize that their views are not shared by a preponderance of Americans, nor how their fans may react to repellant views with which they do not agree.

Another stellar example of this arrogance and celebrity insularity was the implosion of the 1990s ABC prime-time hit TV sitcom “Ellen” (which starred stand-up comedian Ellen DeGeneres) after its star decided to make the show a platform for lesbianism. Viewers didn’t like it and stopped watching. Ellen was mad. The viewers were all a bunch of bigots and big, fat meanies.

On the activist side: On Tuesday, the Black Lives Matter group was forced to apologize (for reasons of public relations legitimacy, rather than desire) for having suggested that a black man had been lynched in a photo released by Minneapolis police, despite the fact that the photo was of a white man who had committed suicide, and that the authorities had clearly stated this upon release of the photo, with an express concern for public sensitivities around the subject of lynching in mind.

Seems one can’t win for losing with these leftists, but then Black Lives Matter has never been reticent with regard to overtly or more subtly inciting race-based antipathy and violence. I would submit that their apology itself reflected a concern for decreasing public empathy vis-à-vis their highly questionable methods and agenda.

Of course, the trend of the American public decidedly shying away from unquestioning support for various causes against their better judgment just because these are being advocated for by celebrities or members of minority groups (with all the implied coercion contained therein) is unlikely to be reasonably represented anywhere but in alternative media outlets.

There is reason for encouragement, however; although markets are sometimes slow in picking up on popular trends, it is more than likely that the American public’s disdain for moral ambivalence, cultural division and leftist propaganda will soon give rise to high-powered, well-funded media and press offerings, leaving America’s maladjusted agitators, pampered celebrity ignoramuses and socialist ideologues out in the cold for good.

Article reposted with permission from Erik Rush

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