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Study: Migrants Are Less Integrated The Longer They Stay in Europe

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Published on: May 2, 2017

A study out of Norway, which was released in January of this year indicates that third world migrants see a dramatic drop in labor participation compared to native-born citizens of Norway the longer they remain in the country.

The 36-page report by the Institute of Labor Economics titled Immigrant Labor Market Integration across Admission Classes examined patterns of labor market integration across immigrant groups.

According to the study, it “draws on Norwegian longitudinal administrative data covering labor earnings and social insurance claims over a 25‐year period and presents a comprehensive picture of immigrant‐native employment and social insurance differentials by admission class and by years since entry.”

According to the researchers at the Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research, they discovered “encouraging signs of labour market integration during an initial period upon migrants’ admission.”

However, “the integration process goes into reverse with widening immigrant-native employment differentials and rising rates of immigrant social insurance dependency”.in a short period of five to ten years, the report indicates that things seems to go backwards.

“The integration process goes into reverse with widening immigrant-native employment differentials and rising rates of immigrant social insurance dependency,” the report reads.

“For refugees and family immigrants from low‐income source countries, we uncover encouraging signs of labor market integration during an initial period upon admission, but after just 5‐10 years, the integration process goes into reverse with widening immigrant-native employment differentials and rising rates of immigrant social insurance dependency,” the report continues.  “Yet, the analysis reveals substantial heterogeneity within admission class and points to an important role of host‐country schooling for successful immigrant labor market integration.”

“Basically we were very surprised by these results, because really the differences between immigrants and Norwegian-born citizens should be getting lesser and lesser the longer migrants have lived in Norway. We found that the opposite happens,” said Knut Røed, a senior researcher at the Frisch Centre.

Norway’s acting minister for immigration and integration Per Sandberg acknowledged the problems that were in the report, but said, “Even if the government went further still in delivering migrants jobs and opportunities, we mustn’t forget that politicians can’t force people to become integrated.”

“There must also be a significant commitment from individuals themselves, if they are wanting to succeed in Norway,” he added.

Or Norway could remove them.  If migrants have become a burden on Norwegians, the government has no responsibility for their upkeep.  And while the welfare state in any country should be abandoned, that is not the only problem.

In 2016, head of the Norwegian Police Security Service (PST) Marie Benedicte Bjørnland said, “A strong increase in immigration, particularly from Muslim countries, can cause other long-term challenges. When a large number of asylum seekers come to a local community, it can have unfortunate consequences.”

This is not rocket science.  You have people from a certain ideology, largely influenced by Muhammad, and they have a very hard time moving past that.  It much more than the labor and welfare issue you have to worry about.  It’s your entire culture imploding on itself.

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