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Tragic: Over last 16 Years France Razed 33 Churches, Built More Than 1,000 Mosques

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Published on: October 15, 2016

According to an English translation of the Polish news site, Wprost.com, since 2000, 33 church buildings have been razed to the ground after record numbers have closed due to less and less Christians attending church in France. Recently media images showed a group of “the faithful” gathered in front of the Church of St. Rita in Paris, who had lobbied against its demolition, as it was torn down.

Over the same time period, more than 1,000 mosques were built throughout France, reflecting nearly 7 million Muslims living in France. France has often been considered the most secular country in Europe, but is poised to become a Muslim country– simply by shear birthrate numbers. Muslim women birth roughly 8 children to every non-Muslim child.

But the numbers are aided by immigration, by Muslim migrants coming to France who believe it is the will of Allah to conquer it. In fact, at last year’s convention of the Union of Islamic Organizations of France (UOIF), Dalil Boubakeur, dean of the Great Mosque of Paris, demanded that the number of mosques being built in France double. He said:

“We have 2,200 mosques, and we have to double their number in two years.”

These mosques would not be enough for the growing and soon becoming largest Muslim community in Western Europe.

Article reposted with permission from Constitution.com

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