Utah Fusion Center Propagandized Cops to Watch Out for Gadsden Flags Ahead of LaVoy Finicum Funeral

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Published on: February 6, 2016

LaVoy Finicum was laid to rest on Friday in Kabab, Utah, nearly two weeks after he was murdered in cold blood in Oregon. Yet, ahead of his funeral, the Utah Statewide Information and Analysis Center, which is funded by the Department of Homeland Security issued warning that will not surprise patriots, but is certainly showing how emboldened they have become. They warned local police to be on the lookout for III% insignias, Gadsden flags, Oathkeepers and those tied to the sovereign citizen movement.

According to the documents, which can be seen below, the fusion center warned, “extremists may utilize such a high profile funeral for media attention or to further ideological beliefs.”

Yet, this same bulletin then went on to state, “No credible threats to law enforcement are present at this time.”

So, why is the Utah Statewide Information and Analysis Center issuing such propaganda if there are no threats? They are demonizing Americans who are seeking to stand on constitutional principles of limited government and by the government usurping their constitutional limitations, they are providing funds to the Utah fusion center. So, in the end, it’s all about money and power.

And though there are no threats, the bulletin goes on to state, “Caravans of individuals traveling to the funeral services may be comprised of one or more armed extremists. Law enforcement should remain vigilant and aware that confrontation with these potentially volatile persons, may include more than one individual. These individuals may adhere to a sovereign citizen ideology, and may not recognize law enforcement as a legitimate authority.”

“Below are some visual indicators of these potential extremist and disaffected individuals: though some or parts of these symbols are representative of patriotic and American revolutionary themes; they are often associated with extremism,” reads the bulletin.

Though the report is listed as unclassified, it was stated to be “For official use only,” and was released on February 3, 2016.

“While no credible threats to law enforcement are present at this time, armed extremists are expected to travel through UT; some of which may see this event as a tipping point, and potentially shift toward more violent action,” the report reads.

Reason reports about the concern of the propaganda:

One private-sector security professional who received the bulletin worries that it could lead to a kind of profiling. “I work with a young man, 24 years old, three associate’s degrees, volunteer fire fighter, dreams of becoming a police officer,” he says. “He’s also an Armenian-Russian immigrant who just earned his American citizenship. He sports a Gadsden flag on his car because of what it represents in our country’s history.” If a cop sees that car today, the security worker worries, the officer’s “thoughts will automagically flip to profiling him” as a violent extremist.

Mike German, a former FBI agent who infiltrated far-right groups in the 1990s, has a similar objection. “I always try to look at these alerts from the perspective of the police officer on the street,” he says. “What will the officers know after reading this that they didn’t before? Here all they know is to be afraid if they see a Gadsden flag, which could result in an unnecessarily hostile encounter that would increase the chances of violence. There’s nothing here that would help them correctly identify someone who held these beliefs, understand what might trigger hostile reactions, or how to talk to them in a way that would defuse any unnecessary tension.” He also worries that the bulletin “improperly implies holding such beliefs makes them dangerous”; most of the people involved in these movements are nonviolent, he says, and treating them all like budding terrorists just makes a confrontation more likely.

German, who is now based at New York University’s Brennan Center for Justice, thinks it’s “perfectly reasonable for the fusion center to make law enforcement aware of the situation regarding the Oregon standoff and police shooting, and how the upcoming funeral might make those out-of-state events more pertinent to local enforcement needs and officer safety.” But he feels the report’s approach is “is unhelpful because it is overgeneralized in describing a threat and lacking in any useful advice. It seems almost like CYA, so they can say ‘we warned ’em’ if anything bad happens.”

In case the Utah fusion center does not recognize it, being armed is American. It’s a protected right. That does not make someone a threat nor an extremist, but you can see how they want to paint these people as domestic terrorists, when the reality is that our forefathers were armed when they assembled peacefully and it was only by being armed that they were able to drive away the British dragoons from their assemblies! I have yet to see anyone in Oregon do the same to the armed domestic terrorists known as the FBI, the armed, criminal and unconstitutional Bureau of Land Management and those who are capitulating to them as though they are being constitutional, like the Oregon State Sheriffs Association, including Harney County Sheriff David Ward.

By the way, the police are encouraged to contact the fusion center if there are any “suspicious activity, intelligence, or threats related to this event (Lavoy Finicum’s funeral).” I’ll encourage those who agree with me, why not send these propagandizers an email or phone call to Sars@utah.govor Statewide Information & Analysis Center (SIAC), 901.256.2360, SIAC@utah.gov and let them know that their behavior and this propaganda is suspicious and a threat against the American people seeking to uphold the Constitution.

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