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Chain Migration Used to Import Entire Family Villages of Foreigners

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Published on: September 25, 2018

President Trump has said: “Chain migration is a disaster for this country and it’s horrible.”

He is right. According to Department of Homeland Security statistics, since 2007, the U.S. has admitted over 117,000 individuals from the three countries that the State Department recognizes as state-sponsors of terrorism: Iran, Syria, and Sudan.

How is the U.S. economy or way of life enriched by a massive influx of Iranians, Sudanese, and Syrians? What are they bringing to the table? Of course, even to ask such a question is islamofauxbic. But the grim reality is that to bring in such people in large numbers without adequate vetting procedures (and what vetting procedures can be adequate for a religion of taqiyya and deceit?) is like playing Russian roulette. The longer we do it, the less likely it is to end well. Look what happened with the fifteen jihadis on this list. And until this program is stopped, they will by no means be the last ones.

“Report: Chain Migration Used to Import Entire Family Villages of Foreigners,” by John Binder, Breitbart, September 18, 2018 (thanks to Todd):

The New York Times is admitting that the process known as “chain migration” — whereby newly naturalized citizens can bring an unlimited number of foreign relatives to the U.S. — is being used to import entire small villages of extended foreign families.

The Times published  a report on two men from India that have used the U.S. legal immigration system to bring their entire extended families to the country for no other reason than the fact that they are related.

The Times reports how one legal immigrant from India was able to eventually bring nearly ten foreign relatives to the country with now more than 90 family members benefiting from chain migration:

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The young engineer arrived in America when he was 23 with a good education and little else. He landed a job at a nuclear test site, and built a home in Nevada. Between the 1970s and the mid-1980s, he brought his wife, mother, five sisters and a brother over from India, his native land. [Emphasis added]

In later years, his siblings sponsored family members of their own, and their clan now stretches from Nevada to Florida, New Jersey to Texas — more than 90 Americans nurtured on the strength of one ambitious engineer, Jagdish Patel, 72. [Emphasis added]

Another legal immigrant chronicled by the Times, Jagdish Patel, was able to bring at least 13 extended foreign family members to the U.S. through chain migration:

In 1977, he became a United States citizen, and sponsored his brother Jay and Jay’s wife for green cards. By 1985, he had also sponsored his mother, five sisters and their husbands and children, most of whom settled in the New York-New Jersey area. [Emphasis added]

As Breitbart News has extensively reported, Since 2005, 9.3 million foreign nationals have been able to resettle in the U.S. through chain migration. This huge inflow outpaces two years of American births, which amount to roughly four million babies every year.

The number of extended-family foreign nationals who have resettled in the U.S. in the last decade is greater than the total combined population of Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, and Cleveland.

Additionally, chain migration has brought more than 117,000 foreign nationals from the three countries that the State Department recognizes as state-sponsors of terrorism — Iran, Syria, and Sudan — to the U.S….

Article posted with permission from Pamela Geller

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