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Maine: Legislature Limit’s Government Use Of Facial Recognition With Law Without Governor’s Signature

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Published on: July 12, 2021

Maine’s legislature limited government use of facial recognition technology by advancing a bill without the governor’s signature that became law.

The Tenth Amendment Center‘s Mike Maharrey has the story.

AUGUSTA, Maine (July 7, 2021) – Last Thursday, a bill limiting government use of facial recognition technology in the state became law without the governor’s signature. The growing movement to prohibit the use of facial recognition at the state and local levels could hinder the operation of a growing national facial recognition network.

Rep. Grayson Lookner (D-Portland)  introduced House Bill 1585 (LD1585) on April 28. The new law bans public employees and officials, including law enforcement officers, from obtaining, retaining, possessing, accessing, or using a facial surveillance system or information derived from a facial surveillance system with some exceptions. It also bans state agencies from entering into agreements with third parties to obtain facial recognition information.

An amendment approved in the Joint Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety allows police to use facial recognition in the investigation of a few serious crimes, including murder and rape. An amendment also excluded iris scans from the ban.

The bill became law on July 1 without Gov. Janet Mills’s signature. It will go into effect on Oct. 1.

“LD1585 creates clear boundaries on how the government can use facial recognition technology, and it carefully defines how law enforcement can use the technology in investigations,” Lookner said in a prepared statement. “I’m proud of this bill and the process it went through, which included bringing law enforcement partners to the table.”

The ACLU of Maine supported the legislation. After LD1585 cleared the Joint Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety, policy counsel Michael Kebede praised the committee for passing the bill.

“Facial recognition technologies give government actors the opportunity of surveilling us constantly and without suspicion, violating core rights of privacy, association and expression. This bill is an important step in maintaining democratic control over the technology, instead of letting the technology and its unregulated use run roughshod over our rights.”

According to the Press Herald, the Maine Sheriffs Association opposed the bill, claiming opponents of facial recognition overstate its misuse.

Voters in Portland, Maine, approved a ballot measure banning facial recognition in the city last November.

IMPACT ON FEDERAL PROGRAMS

recent report revealed that the federal government has turned state drivers’ license photos into a giant facial recognition database, putting virtually every driver in America in a perpetual electronic police lineup. The revelations generated widespread outrage, but this story isn’t new. The federal government has been developing a massive, nationwide facial recognition system for years.

The FBI rolled out a nationwide facial recognition program in the fall of 2014, with the goal of building a giant biometric database with pictures provided by the states and corporate friends.

In 2016, the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law released “The Perpetual Lineup,” a massive report on law enforcement use of facial recognition technology in the U.S. You can read the complete report at perpetuallineup.org. The organization conducted a year-long investigation and collected more than 15,000 pages of documents through more than 100 public records requests. The report paints a disturbing picture of intense cooperation between the federal government, and state and local law enforcement to develop a massive facial recognition database.

“Face recognition is a powerful technology that requires strict oversight. But those controls, by and large, don’t exist today,” report co-author Clare Garvie said. “With only a few exceptions, there are no laws governing police use of the technology, no standards ensuring its accuracy, and no systems checking for bias. It’s a wild west.”

There are many technical and legal problems with facial recognition, including significant concerns about the accuracy of the technology, particularly when reading the facial features of minority populations. During a test run by the ACLU of Northern California, facial recognition misidentified 26 members of the California legislature as people in a database of arrest photos.

With facial recognition technology, police and other government officials have the capability to track individuals in real-time. These systems allow law enforcement agents to use video cameras and continually scan everybody who walks by. According to the report, several major police departments have expressed an interest in this type of real-time tracking. Documents revealed agencies in at least five major cities, including Los Angeles, either claimed to run real-time face recognition off of street cameras, bought technology with the capability, or expressed written interest in buying it.

In all likelihood, the federal government heavily involves itself in helping state and local agencies obtain this technology. The feds provide grant money to local law enforcement agencies for a vast array of surveillance gear, including ALPRs, stingray devices and drones. The federal government essentially encourages and funds a giant nationwide surveillance net and then taps into the information via fusion centers and the Information Sharing Environment (ISE).

Fusion centers were sold as a tool to combat terrorism, but that is not how they are being used. The ACLU pointed to a bipartisan congressional report to demonstrate the true nature of government fusion centers: “They haven’t contributed anything meaningful to counterterrorism efforts. Instead, they have largely served as police surveillance and information sharing nodes for law enforcement efforts targeting the frequent subjects of police attention: Black and brown people, immigrants, dissidents, and the poor.”

Fusion centers operate within the broader ISE. According to its website, the ISE “provides analysts, operators, and investigators with information needed to enhance national security. These analysts, operators, and investigators…have mission needs to collaborate and share information with each other and with private sector partners and our foreign allies.” In other words, ISE serves as a conduit for the sharing of information gathered without a warrant. Known ISE partners include the Office of Director of National Intelligence which oversees 17 federal agencies and organizations, including the NSA. ISE utilizes these partnerships to collect and share data on the millions of unwitting people they track.

Reports that the Berkeley Police Department in cooperation with a federal fusion center deployed cameras equipped to surveil a “free speech” rally and Antifa counterprotests provided the first solid link between the federal government and local authorities in facial recognition surveillance.

In a nutshell, without state and local cooperation, the feds have a much more difficult time gathering information. Passage of state laws and local ordinances banning and limiting facial recognition eliminates one avenue for gathering facial recognition data. Simply put, data that doesn’t exist cannot be entered into federal databases.

This is a very important law.  Now, the job will be to make sure that corrupt government doesn’t just ignore it and continue to pursue this 1984-esque tyrannical push against the people.

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