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Tyranny Down Under: Video Shows Pregnant Mom Arrested At Home For Facebook Post Promoting Anti-Lockdown Protest

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Published on: September 2, 2020

In what can only be described as the new brown shirts down under in Australia, a pregnant mother was arrested for simply posting that she was promoting an anti-lockdown protest on Facebook.  This led to not only her arrest for “incitement” but also the seizure of her computer property.

The right to protest a criminal government is a God-given right whether you are in the US or not,which it is why it is “God given.”

The video was posted on Facebook as the team of Nazis came in to arrest the pregnant woman who had an appointment for an ultrasound.

Trending: South Dakota Governor: I Don’t Have The Authority To Lockdown The State, They Are Attacking Our Religious Freedoms - What Is It That The People Don’t See Here?

Yes this is happening in Australia – BallaratMay I remind you of your birth rights in the state where this happened. Read them – print them – know them. You are not an entity. You are not a corporation (corpse). You are not a person. You are a living man or woman. If you don’t know your rights – you have none. https://www.humanrights.vic.gov.au/for-individuals/right-to-freedom-of-expression/https://www.humanrights.vic.gov.au/for-individuals/right-to-peaceful-assembly-and-association/This was never about a virus ladies and gents 🤢🤢🤮🤮🤑🤑And to think it is very likely they have these “powers” for another 6 months thanks to a certain premier @zoe lee my heart goes out to you.

Posted by Anthony Golle on Tuesday, September 1, 2020

The Daily Mail reported:

Zoe Buhler, 28, was handcuffed in her lounge room in front of her children and partner on Wednesday afternoon and charged with incitement.

Several officers entered the house in Miners Rest, Ballarat, northwest of Melbourne, with a search warrant and began reading the young mother her rights.

‘Excuse me, incitement for what, what on Earth? I’m in my pyjamas, my two kids are here,’ she said, clearly confused.

‘I have an ultrasound in an hour because I’m pregnant.’ 

Ms Buhler’s alleged offending post linked to a since-deleted ‘Freedom Day Ballarat’ event she created for 11am on Saturday on Sturt Street.

‘Anyone from Ballarat please join us in our fight for freedom and human rights!’ she wrote on Sunday with a link to the event page.

The increasingly distressed mother insisted she wasn’t breaking any laws by creating and then promoting the event. 

‘Actually you are, that’s why we’re arresting you in relation to incitement,’ police replied.

Ms Buhler offered to delete the post as her boyfriend James Timmins tried to mediate while cradling their infant child in his arms.

‘How about she just doesn’t do the event? It’s not like she’s done it, she made a post,’ he said.

Police were unmoved, telling her: ‘You’ve already committed the offence.’ 

Ms Buhler was distressed by this point and crying so much she could barely tell officers that she ‘didn’t realise’ she was ‘doing anything wrong’ in making the online event.  

Police said they would seize all electronic devices in the house including those belonging to Mr Timmins and Ms Buhler’s sister.

Ms Buhler was charged with later incitement released on bail to face Ballarat Magistrates Court on January 25 next year.

January of next year?  You have got to be kidding me!  For a Facebook post!

There is no way this is against the law and notice the little tyrant doesn’t cite the law.

The guy arresting her is in clear violation of the law.

According to Australian law, this woman has the right to assemble as she posted:

Right to peaceful assembly and freedom of association

Section 16 of the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities (the Charter) protects your right to gather for a common purpose or to pursue common goals, such as protesting, gathering or meeting, whether in public or in private. The Charter applies to public authorities in Victoria, such as state and local government departments and agencies, and people delivering services on behalf of the government.

According to the same page on human rights for the government of Australia:

How does the law protect me?

Democracy relies on people being able to gather peacefully to share their beliefs and opinions. This section of the Charter includes two related rights. 

The right to peaceful assembly

Under the Charter, you have the right to assemble peacefully. Often this right is connected to the idea of protest or demonstration, but it also applies to people gathering for social, cultural, religious and professional purposes. It applies to people meeting in private or in public. 

The right to freedom of association

Under the Charter, you have the right to meet with other people – for example, to form a trade union or similar group – to protect your common interests. This could cover economic, professional, cultural or recreational interests.  This right does not automatically allow you to join an established group. Each group has the right to determine its own membership rules. 

Can this right be limited in any way?

In some circumstances, one person’s right may come into conflict with the right of another person or group. In these circumstances, it can be necessary to limit or restrict these rights. Under section 7(2) of the Charter, rights may be limited in certain circumstances, but it must be reasonable, necessary, justified and proportionate.

In certain situations, the right to peaceful assembly and the right to association could be limited to ensure the safety and security of a prison. The right to freedom of association could be limited through the Victorian Parliament passing laws to prevent groups involved in criminal activity from gathering together. 

How we can help

We can give you information about Victoria’s Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities but the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission does not handle complaints related to the Charter.

If you would like more information about the Charter and your rights contact us.

For information about the legal history of this right, case law or Australia’s human rights framework, you can read more in our Policy and Legal sections of this website.

How to make a human rights complaint

If you think your human rights have been breached, you should contact the Victorian Ombudsman.

If you want to make a complaint about police conduct, contact the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission.

The Australian government’s website also protects the following:

Right to freedom of expression

Section 15 of the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities (the Charter) protects your right to have your own opinion, to seek and receive information, and to express yourself. These rights come with responsibilities – to respect the rights and reputation of others and not risk public safety. The Charter applies to public authorities in Victoria, such as state and local government departments and agencies, and people delivering services on behalf of the government.

And what is that exactly?  According to the website:

How does the law protect me?

Being able to form and express your own opinions and express them freely is an important part of your self expression. This section of the Charter protects three related rights. 

The right to hold an opinion without interference

Under the Charter, you have the right to hold an opinion without having anyone interfere with your thoughts or beliefs. 

The right to freedom of expression

Under the Charter, you have the right to express your opinions freely and to seek, receive and share information and ideas. This might be through conversation, but it could also be in writing, in print or through artistic expression. 

Responsibilities related to freedom of expression

The right to freedom of expression brings with it some responsibilities. You must respect the rights and reputation of other people, and the opinions you express must not risk national security, the safety of the Victorian public, or people’s individual morality. 

Can this right be limited in any way?

In some circumstances, one person’s right may come into conflict with the right of another person or group. In these circumstances, it can be necessary to limit or restrict these rights. Under section 7(2) of the Charter, rights may be limited in certain circumstances, but it must be reasonable, necessary, justified and proportionate.

The right to freedom of expression may be limited in some circumstances – for example, to respect the rights and reputation of others or for the protection of national security, public order, public health or public morality. 

How we can help

We can give you information about Victoria’s Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities but the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission does not handle complaints related to the Charter.

If you would like more information about the Charter and your rights contact us.

For information about the legal history of this right, case law or Australia’s human rights framework, you can read more in our Policy and Legal sections of this website.

How to make a human rights complaint

If you think your human rights have been breached, you should contact the Victorian Ombudsman.

If you want to make a complaint about police conduct, contact the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission.

However, without guns to equal the playing field against tyrants, these poor people are left helpless.

The officer in charge not only took the woman’s things, but apparently took the man’s phone, who was filming.

He is clearly an agent of the state and should be dealt with for his criminal violation of Australian law against this family.

I suggest that any and all Australians who can be at the place she posted and time, arrive as armed as you can to protest this tyranny.  In fact, you should be going to where this woman is held and not let a single officer leave for home till they have freed her and dropped all charges against her.

Stand as one or you’ll die individually!

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